Top News

The Journal Pioneer

CINDY DAY: Storm brewed… lesson learned

Lynn Winfield watched as Dorian unleashed crashing waves at Sandy Point in Shelburne, N.S. last September.
Lynn Winfield watched as Dorian unleashed crashing waves at Sandy Point in Shelburne, N.S. last September. - Contributed

Last weekend I did what many Atlantic Canadians did. I prepared for the storm.

In no particular order, I stocked up on groceries, made sure I had cash on hand, located my battery supply and pre-cooked some meals that I could eat cold in case the power went out. I also decided to pick up a few local beers for the Sunday storm. There are so many great micro-breweries now that I usually sample one or two each week. I’ve been known to choose a beer based on the label, its name and even the shape of the bottle.

I took this little fella home and learned something very interesting about our weather.
I took this little fella home and learned something very interesting about our weather.

Last Saturday, one of the beers that caught my eye was Tantoaster - Baltic Porter. It came in a 355ml bottle and is brewed by the Boxing Rock Brewing Company, located in Shelburne on Nova Scotia’s South Shore.

On Sunday, as the NFL pre-game show was winding down, I took the beer out of the fridge. I love to read the labels and this one revealed quite a story; it might also explain why I was drawn to it.

Did you know that a Tan toaster is a storm? Yup.

“A REAL tantoaster’s comin’ up the coast as the oldtimers say on nearby Cape Sable Island when a wicked storm is brewing.”

So, when the tan toaster of tan toasters (by the name of Dorian) blew through Nova Scotia this past September, Boxing Rock brewed up this wonderful Baltic Porter.

This is from the label on the bottle: “Full of dark chocolate malt, spicy pine Magnum hops, this 7.5% ABV Porter is a balanced, smooth and pairs well with a pair of boots, a perfect tantoaster of a storm, a blazing fire in the fireplace, and anything cooked on the woodstove (because the power’s probably out but you’ve got Baltic Porter
and plenty of cans in the pantry so it’s all good).

How did I not know this? So, I drank the beer feeling pretty good about learning something about local weather lore and supporting local, all at the same time.

Cheers!



Cindy Day is the chief meteorologist for SaltWire Network


On a scale of 1-10, how likely are you to recommend the Journal Pioneer?


Recent Stories