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Atlantic Indigenous women's group asks all Canadians to back missing, murdered women's report

Chief commissioner Marion Buller prepares to hand over the final report during the closing ceremony of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Gatineau. - Chris Wattie/Reuters
Chief commissioner Marion Buller prepares to hand over the final report during the closing ceremony of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Gatineau. - Chris Wattie/Reuters

Report calls for overhaul of systemic status quo

OTTAWA, Ont. —

Indigenous women leaders from the four Atlantic provinces attended the closing ceremony of the National Inquiry in Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Ottawa Monday.

The group, known as Eastern Door Indigenous Women’s Association, united in support of the inquiry’s report, which describes violence against Indigenous women as genocide. It also delivers 231 individual calls for justice directed at governments, institutions, social service providers, industries and all Canadians.

As a party with standing at the national inquiry, EDIWA supports the national inquiry’s finding of ongoing genocide and issued a statement following the report’s release, asking for all Canadians to grant the report continued support.

MMIWG Final Report Openings

Marion Butler speaking at the opening.

Posted by The Eastern Door on Monday, June 3, 2019

“We hope to foster political will and support to move forward as a region, working together with all levels of government, all political parties and organizations to find distinct solutions for the women in the Atlantic,” reads the statement.

The Atlantic Indigenous women leaders have led in advocacy, demonstrations, marches and offering one-on-one services, representation and wrap-around support to Indigenous families, communities, women, two spirit and gender diverse people – for decades.

Marlene Thomas, vice-president of the Aboriginal Women’s Association of P.E.I.
Marlene Thomas, vice-president of the Aboriginal Women’s Association of P.E.I.

“This report advocates for a complete overhaul of the status quo, including ensuring Indigenous women are afforded the human rights protections equal to all Canadians. With meaningful implementations in this report, Canada will commence a journey to reconciliation,” said Cheryl Maloney, founding president of EDIWA.

Marlene Thomas, vice-president of the Aboriginal Women’s Association of P.E.I. urged organizations, leaders and Canadians to pick up the phone and find out how to become part of the solution.

“Call us. If you want to be part of the future, part of the solution, call your provincial Indigenous women leaders,” she said.

“Listen to the frontline workers. Spread your resources to Indigenous-led service providers. Include our perspectives in all facets. We all need to be part of the solution; Indigenous women can’t do this alone,” said Thomas.

EDIWA supports Mi’kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy and Indigenous women, girls, two-spirit and gender diverse Indigenous people in the Atlantic region. EDIWA gave submissions before the inquiry in December of 2018 and will continue to work to give life to the national inquiry’s report.

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