Top News

Shooting survivor says ‘They still help me get through every day’

FILE PHOTO: Shayna Conway, shown in Charlottetown in 2014, says her three friends and still a part of her life and her inspiration for moving forward.
FILE PHOTO: Shayna Conway, shown in Charlottetown in 2014, says her three friends and still a part of her life and her inspiration for moving forward.

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. – Shayna Conway feels as though she’s still waiting to wake up from a dream.

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. – Shayna Conway feels as though she’s still waiting to wake up from a dream.

Although five years have passed since Conway’s good friends, Alberta native Tabitha Stepple and Island ballplayers Mitch MacLean and Tanner Craswell, were killed, the memories still don't feel real to the Charlottetown native.

RELATED: Angels in the outfield: Remembering Mitch MacLean, Tanner Craswell

Conway’s three friends are still part of her everyday life, whether by looking at their pictures covering her wall or remembering their senses of humour.

“Not a day goes by when I’m not praying . . . thinking about them,” said Conway, now 26. “They still help me get through every day.”

Conway was the lone survivor from the roadside triple murder and suicide near Claresholm, Alta.

After being shot four times, which required three months of hospitalization, as well as many surgeries and physiotherapy, hospital staff said it was amazing Conway survived the attack.

Although recovering from the traumatic event has been an ongoing process, Conway credits her relationship with God in helping her come to peace with everything that’s happened in her life.

She still receives messages from teammates of MacLean and Craswell wishing her well.

Conway is often approached in public, and although it’s sometimes overwhelming, she said it’s nice to see her three friends being remembered.

“I still get lots of phone calls and messages. But it’s nice to feel loved,” said Conway, who is now a nursing student at UPEI with hopes of one day making a positive difference in other people’s lives around the world.

The decision to choose the career path was partially influenced by her own treatment in hospitals where she said nursing staff went above and beyond to help her heal physically, emotionally and spiritually.

“They were all amazing,” said Conway, who has already begun giving back.

Since May 2015, Conway has been on two mission trips to Haiti and Bolivia, where she has three foster children.

She’s now in the process of planning a third trip, which will involve going back to Haiti to build a home for one of those children.

For Conway, living her life to the fullest potential is her only option.

It’s what her three friends would have wanted.

“They’re pretty much the reason for everything I do,” said Conway. “How selfish would it be for me to waste my potential with all the things I could be doing to help others?

“Because that’s what they would be doing.”

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. – Shayna Conway feels as though she’s still waiting to wake up from a dream.

Although five years have passed since Conway’s good friends, Alberta native Tabitha Stepple and Island ballplayers Mitch MacLean and Tanner Craswell, were killed, the memories still don't feel real to the Charlottetown native.

RELATED: Angels in the outfield: Remembering Mitch MacLean, Tanner Craswell

Conway’s three friends are still part of her everyday life, whether by looking at their pictures covering her wall or remembering their senses of humour.

“Not a day goes by when I’m not praying . . . thinking about them,” said Conway, now 26. “They still help me get through every day.”

Conway was the lone survivor from the roadside triple murder and suicide near Claresholm, Alta.

After being shot four times, which required three months of hospitalization, as well as many surgeries and physiotherapy, hospital staff said it was amazing Conway survived the attack.

Although recovering from the traumatic event has been an ongoing process, Conway credits her relationship with God in helping her come to peace with everything that’s happened in her life.

She still receives messages from teammates of MacLean and Craswell wishing her well.

Conway is often approached in public, and although it’s sometimes overwhelming, she said it’s nice to see her three friends being remembered.

“I still get lots of phone calls and messages. But it’s nice to feel loved,” said Conway, who is now a nursing student at UPEI with hopes of one day making a positive difference in other people’s lives around the world.

The decision to choose the career path was partially influenced by her own treatment in hospitals where she said nursing staff went above and beyond to help her heal physically, emotionally and spiritually.

“They were all amazing,” said Conway, who has already begun giving back.

Since May 2015, Conway has been on two mission trips to Haiti and Bolivia, where she has three foster children.

She’s now in the process of planning a third trip, which will involve going back to Haiti to build a home for one of those children.

For Conway, living her life to the fullest potential is her only option.

It’s what her three friends would have wanted.

“They’re pretty much the reason for everything I do,” said Conway. “How selfish would it be for me to waste my potential with all the things I could be doing to help others?

“Because that’s what they would be doing.”

Did this story inform or enhance your perspective on this subject?
1 being least likely, and 10 being most likely

Recent Stories