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Rogers Hometown Hockey in Summerside unites fans of the sport


Just because Daniel Rix cheers for the Habs, while his father, Doug, is a Leafs fan, doesn’t mean the two can’t recall countless memories together, sharing a love for Canada’s game.

Rix developed a passion for hockey soon after he could walk.

“I started skating when I was two years old,” said Rix. “I played all the way through minor hockey and junior hockey.

He grew up in O’Leary, playing on local teams, and attending off-Island games.

“My biggest memory was the first time I played in the Monctonian tournament. I was a goalie, and I had a shut out.”

Whether they were playing, watching it live or on TV, or Doug cheering on his son at his games, Rix and his father found hockey was something they could bond over.

“We have a close relationship to this day. There is definitely friendly rivalry, and it’s always fun.”

Rix now lives in Charlottetown, and his two-year-old twin boys, Cole and Ryan, are now the same age he was when his love for the sport first began.

“They love watching hockey with dad and going to the local Islanders games.

“I plan on letting them make the choice if they want to be involved in hockey, and hopefully they love it just as much as I did.”

Rix and his family attended the Rogers Hometown Hockey event in Summerside, which was presented by Scotiabank over the weekend.

“It’s a great event, and I hope they keep it going. We’re just taking it all in.”

He’s going to be a hockey fan for the rest of his days.

“They go hand-in-hand – Canada and hockey.”

Hockey legend Rick Vaive, who grew up in Charlottetown, was at the free weekend-long event, greeting fans as he signed autographs and posed for pictures.

“It’s fantastic. There has been great reception,” he said of the one of 24 tours that have been taking place across the country.

“The people here are wonderful. I didn’t realize I had this many fans,” he laughed.

Coming into cities like Summerside is a great way to experience people’s love of the game, said Vaive.

“This is what it’s all about. The grassroots hockey means more than anything else.”

That’s what Scotiabank is trying to accomplish by sponsoring 5,000 teams across Canada, he added.

Vaive learned how to skate when he was three years old.

“My dad wanted me to learn how to skate first, and it was always on an outdoor rink. When I was seven, he said, ‘let’s do it.’ And I just kept going from there.”

Hockey has played a major role in his life, and he and his family have moved a lot because of it.

“I’m fortunate I got the opportunity to play in the National Hockey League for 13 years. It’s the best hockey league in the world. I got to be the captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs,” said Vaive. “When you’re growing up as a young Canadian boy, I’m not sure you could ask for much more than that.

“Canadians are crazy about hockey. We take ownership of it, and we feel it’s our game.”

newsroom@journalpioneer.com

Rix developed a passion for hockey soon after he could walk.

“I started skating when I was two years old,” said Rix. “I played all the way through minor hockey and junior hockey.

He grew up in O’Leary, playing on local teams, and attending off-Island games.

“My biggest memory was the first time I played in the Monctonian tournament. I was a goalie, and I had a shut out.”

Whether they were playing, watching it live or on TV, or Doug cheering on his son at his games, Rix and his father found hockey was something they could bond over.

“We have a close relationship to this day. There is definitely friendly rivalry, and it’s always fun.”

Rix now lives in Charlottetown, and his two-year-old twin boys, Cole and Ryan, are now the same age he was when his love for the sport first began.

“They love watching hockey with dad and going to the local Islanders games.

“I plan on letting them make the choice if they want to be involved in hockey, and hopefully they love it just as much as I did.”

Rix and his family attended the Rogers Hometown Hockey event in Summerside, which was presented by Scotiabank over the weekend.

“It’s a great event, and I hope they keep it going. We’re just taking it all in.”

He’s going to be a hockey fan for the rest of his days.

“They go hand-in-hand – Canada and hockey.”

Hockey legend Rick Vaive, who grew up in Charlottetown, was at the free weekend-long event, greeting fans as he signed autographs and posed for pictures.

“It’s fantastic. There has been great reception,” he said of the one of 24 tours that have been taking place across the country.

“The people here are wonderful. I didn’t realize I had this many fans,” he laughed.

Coming into cities like Summerside is a great way to experience people’s love of the game, said Vaive.

“This is what it’s all about. The grassroots hockey means more than anything else.”

That’s what Scotiabank is trying to accomplish by sponsoring 5,000 teams across Canada, he added.

Vaive learned how to skate when he was three years old.

“My dad wanted me to learn how to skate first, and it was always on an outdoor rink. When I was seven, he said, ‘let’s do it.’ And I just kept going from there.”

Hockey has played a major role in his life, and he and his family have moved a lot because of it.

“I’m fortunate I got the opportunity to play in the National Hockey League for 13 years. It’s the best hockey league in the world. I got to be the captain of the Toronto Maple Leafs,” said Vaive. “When you’re growing up as a young Canadian boy, I’m not sure you could ask for much more than that.

“Canadians are crazy about hockey. We take ownership of it, and we feel it’s our game.”

newsroom@journalpioneer.com

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