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P.E.I. teacher convicted of sex offences paroled

Former high school music teacher Roger Jabbour leaves the provincial courthouse in Charlottetown after being acquitted on sex-related charges dating back more than 25 years.
Former high school music teacher Roger Jabbour leaves the provincial courthouse in Charlottetown after being acquitted on sex-related charges dating back more than 25 years. - Terrence McEachern

Roger James Jabbour has conditions imposed on his release from provincial jail

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. —

A former high school music teacher who was convicted of three sex offences involving students is back in the community after he was granted full parole. 

In its decision, the Parole Board of Canada said it was of the opinion Roger James Jabbour wouldn’t present an undue risk to society if released on full parole and it would help with his reintegration into society as a law-abiding citizen.

The board also said in its decision that it questioned the degree of ownership Jabbour took for what happened.

Jabbour was a teacher at Colonel Gray High School in Charlottetown at the time of the offences that led to convictions on two counts of sexual exploitation and one count of sexual interference after allegations involving three victims.

He was sentenced to serve 15 months in the Provincial Correctional Centre.

Jabbour was acquitted on two other charges of sexual exploitation dating back to the early 1990s involving a fourth complainant.

He has since retired from teaching.

In the parole board’s decision, it said Jabbour didn’t undergo any assessment or programming related to personal emotional issues linked to his offences.

The board said Jabbour didn’t do an assessment because he interpreted his participation and any possible findings as potentially compromising his parole application.

“Although you have been characterized as opportunistic versus predatory with respect to sexual offending, a formal assessment would have been useful in the overall assessment of risk,” the report said.

In its analysis, the board said it placed weight on his victims’ traumatic experiences and the interpretation of his behaviours that Jabbour shared, which were both aggravating factors.

The board said it questioned the degree of ownership Jabbour took for what happened and his commitment to engaging in an assessment that could lead to a treatment plan.

“The board finds your hesitancy towards an assessment perplexing.”

Although the board noted there were few, if any, “flags” suggesting sexual deviancy, it also said the behaviours the police shared in support of the charges begged the need for further exploration by professionals.

With his release on full parole, Jabbour will be subject to several conditions, including that he not have any contact with his victims.

The board said the victims and their families have been traumatized by Jabbour’s behaviour and any attempt to contact them would be unwanted and inappropriate.

“They deserve privacy and space to heal.”

Jabbour is also banned from being in the presence of any girls younger than 16 unless he is accompanied by an adult who knows his criminal history and has his parole supervisor’s approval.

He is also not allowed to hold any position of trust or authority over any girls under the age of 16.

“Through your actions you have demonstrated that you cannot be trusted around females, particularly where you have a trust and or authority relationship.”

The board also included a condition Jabbour must follow a treatment plan or program in the area of sexual deviancy.

“It is critical that a professional assessment be conducted so that you and your illegal behaviours are properly understood and a treatment plan is developed if appropriate.”

Failing to participate in an assessment would signal an increase in risk, the board said.

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