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Charlottetown resident fed up with speeding on neighbourhood street

Jim Bliss, right, a long-time resident of Palmers Lane in Charlottetown, says he is extremely frustrated with motorists who speed on his street and is calling for more police action. He has also solicited the support of city councillor Mitchell Tweel, a long-time advocate of increased traffic enforcement in the city.
Jim Bliss, right, a long-time resident of Palmers Lane in Charlottetown, says he is extremely frustrated with motorists who speed on his street and is calling for more police action. He has also solicited the support of city councillor Mitchell Tweel, a long-time advocate of increased traffic enforcement in the city. - Dave Stewart

Jim Bliss says it's time for police to finally do something about a long-running problem on Palmers Lane

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. —

A Charlottetown resident says he is beyond frustrated with people speeding on his quiet neighbourhood street.

Jim Bliss, who has lived on Palmers Lane near Parkdale Elementary School since 1972, said not even speed bumps or flashing speed signs have deterred pedal-heavy motorists.

“At times, I’ve felt like throwing a pile of bloody nails and screws on the road, that’s how annoyed I’ve been but, what can you do about it,’’ Bliss said, visibly upset. “For years, we’ve all been complaining and nothing has ever been done. 

“I’d like to see everybody slow down and more police action. If officers want to park their police car in my driveway or my garage (and monitor traffic) they are welcome to it.’’

Charlottetown councillor Mitchell Tweel, who has complained about speeding issues on neighbourhood streets for years, is calling for increased speed enforcement.

Tweel says that while the city’s police department does an excellent job of enforcement on the major routes in the capital, officers need to step things up on the smaller streets.

“At times, I’ve felt like throwing a pile of bloody nails and screws on the road, that’s how annoyed I’ve been but, what can you do about it. For years, we’ve all been complaining and nothing has ever been done.’’
- Jim Bliss, a resident of Palmers Lane

The city’s protective and emergency services committee releases the number of speeding tickets issued each month, and the numbers do show that the majority of tickets issued tends to be on the bypass, University Avenue and St. Peters Road, to cite three examples, although the numbers also show tickets issued in school zones during the school year.

“I’m talking about neighbourhood safety,’’ Tweel said Thursday. “I’m talking about the fact we need to put more emphasis on neighbourhood streets.’’

Tweel said pre-budget consultations will start soon, the perfect time for Charlottetown Police Services to look at its budget and look at opportunities such as creating a traffic unit whose officers have one purpose, to enforce speed limits on all streets, not just the main arteries.

“Neighbourhoods in the city would welcome that. Safety and security is a major issue in this city.’’

Palmers Lane, for example, has a speed limit of 30 km/h in the school zone which ends right at Bliss’s driveway about halfway down the street where it bumps up to 40 km/h. And, that speed limit is only in affect from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Bliss said that doesn’t make any sense. He argues it should be 30 km/h on the entire street 24 hours a day.

Speed bumps have been used on streets like Palmers Lane, but Bliss said they’ve been ineffective. Bliss said in the past, police have told him they have clocked traffic at almost 60 km/h on the street.

Tweel said he agrees with Bliss and would like to see a review done of all school zone speed limits, pointing out the fact that schools have playgrounds and the presence of children outside school hours is a major factor.


Twitter.com/DveStewart

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