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SaltWire Selects Sept. 16: Facing cancer with positivity, recognizing trailblazers, a heart of thanks in the water

Judy DesRoches celebrates her last chemotherapy treatment by ringing the bell with her husband, Marc, and daughter, Lydia.
Judy DesRoches celebrates her last chemotherapy treatment by ringing the bell with her husband, Marc, and daughter, Lydia. - Contributed

These stories about Atlantic Canada's people and their communities are worth your time today

No room for negativity 

"As Judy DesRoches leaned over her infant’s highchair to feed him, a wisp of hair fell from her head. It was the last straw," writes SaltWire's Carole Morris-Underhill. "She had already cut her hair twice in an effort to reduce her hair loss. But at that moment, as she looked at the strands laying near his food, she knew it was time to get out the clippers." 

That's just an example of how DesRoches, of Windsor, N.S., embraced positivity over negativity during her battle with triple-negative breast cancer, a rare form that typically requires individualized treatment plans. 

Read about how she's using that positive outlook to inspire participants in the area's virtual Terry Fox Run this year

Judy DesRoches, the head of the female residence at King’s-Edgehill School, was all smiles at the beginning of the school year. It’s been more than a year since the mother of three was diagnosed with breast cancer. - Carole Morris-Underhill
Judy DesRoches, the head of the female residence at King’s-Edgehill School, was all smiles at the beginning of the school year. It’s been more than a year since the mother of three was diagnosed with breast cancer. - Carole Morris-Underhill

Preserving history 

The aesthetic of the St. John's, N.L. home would be enough in itself to qualify it for heritage status. 

What really makes it special, however, are the people who have owned it — both past and present, writes the Telegram's Juanita Mercer

Elizabeth (Bettie) Duff lived in the house until she died on her 90th birthday in 2016.

Notes in the St. John's city council agenda describe Duff as “a woman ahead of her time” and “a pioneer for the women’s movement" — she was the first female clerk of the House of Assembly in the province, and the first female clerk of any legislative body in all of Canada.

She was also the private secretary to former premier Joseph Smallwood for 23 years, and held executive assistant positions in government before becoming clerk.

Find out what the home's heritage designation means for its future and find out more about its history, inclduing a video tour

Beverley Brace: “I like to know that long after I’m gone, that house is going to be there. And it’s something that I did in my life that will remain after I’m not there. Whether someone else owns it, heritage protects the house from being destroyed.” -KEITH GOSSE/THE TELEGRAM - Keith Gosse
Beverley Brace: “I like to know that long after I’m gone, that house is going to be there. And it’s something that I did in my life that will remain after I’m not there. Whether someone else owns it, heritage protects the house from being destroyed.” - Keith Gosse

Heart of thanks

The Bluenose II crew took a page out of Dimitri Neonakis’s book on their last day of the 2020 season. 

The schooner sailed in the shape of a heart in Nova Scotia's Lunenburg Harbour before packing it in for the season this week. 

Capt. Phil Watson told the Chronicle Herald's Nicole Munro that he and his crew were inspired by the Dartmouth pilot, who has been painting pictures in the sky and posting them to Twitter since the tragic mass shooting in April. 

Watson said the crew saw such an overwhelming response from Nova Scotians and reactions to the ship that they wanted to "draw" the heart to thank everyone who made the season a memorable one for the best of reasons. 

“Every little harbour we went into, you’d see someone post a photo online about how much they appreciated seeing the ship,” Watson said. “We went along the coast of the Bay of Fundy and every time the road came down to the beach there were two or three cars parked there watching the boats go past. It was incredible.” 

Read on for the full story

The Bluenose II sailed in the shape of a heart in the Lunenburg Harbour on the last day of its 2020 season on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, to thank Nova Scotians. - Contributed
The Bluenose II sailed in the shape of a heart in the Lunenburg Harbour on the last day of its 2020 season on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, to thank Nova Scotians. - Contributed

 


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