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New technology being used to replace sewer lines in Charlottetown

An example of a metal pipe lined with a new, cured-in-place resin plastic pipe.  ©Photo by Trenchless Pipe Lining, a division of Maddrey Enterprises Inc.
An example of a metal pipe lined with a new, cured-in-place resin plastic pipe. ©Photo by Trenchless Pipe Lining, a division of Maddrey Enterprises Inc.

The City of Charlottetown is spending $3 million to replace old sewer mains in two areas of the city.

Ottawa-based Clean Water Works is working in two neighbourhoods – Parkdale, which will cost $2.5 million, and Brighton, which will take the remaining $500,000.

The project is a sewer main relining project. Traditionally, this type of work would have been completed by digging up the old line and putting in a new line, but a city spokesperson says Clean Water Works uses trenchless technology.

That means there is far less excavation work completed in the city’s streets.

The lines will be repaired by pulling a tube, similar to a sock filled with resin, through the old line.

“We will then inflate the tube and heat the resin, curing it in place,’’ the city spokesperson said in an email. “This creates a solid new pipe on the inside of the old pipe. A robot will then be sent down into the line and cut holes out where customer sewer laterals join into the sewer main.’’

The technology is known as cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) lining.

CIPP is a resin-saturated felt tube or robust sleeve composed of polyester that is inverted or pulled into aging and damaged sewer pipes. Typically, the CIPP lining tube is inserted into the damaged pipe with either air pressure or water pressure. Hot water or steam is then to cure the resin which then forms a solid, impregnable mass that lines the interior dimensions of a sewer pipe, taking the form of the pipe and providing a seamless, tight-fitting and corrosion-resistant lining.

It’s designed to add 50 years to the life of the pipe. Some of the city’s sewer mains are more than 70 years old

There are no contractors in P.E.I. that complete this type of work, but there is a local contractor that will work with the Ottawa contractor to complete any excavation work.

The Parkdale work is scheduled to be completed by March 31 while the work in Brighton should wrap up by July.

 

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