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Export Development Canada opens first office in P.E.I.


Published on June 6, 2017

Patrick Murphy has opened Export Development Canada’s first office in P.E.I., located on the second floor of BDC Place in Charlottetown. His wife is from P.E.I., so needless to say they’re thrilled about the move. Murphy said he plans on spending as much time as possible meeting and talking to small- and medium-sized businesses that export.

©THE GUARDIAN/Dave Stewart

CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. – Businesses in P.E.I. that export can expect a phone call or a visit from Patrick Murphy soon

The Newfoundland and Labrador native has opened Export Development Canada’s (EDC) first office on Kent Street in Charlottetown and he can’t wait to get started.

The senior account manager is manning the office all by himself on the second floor of BDC Place, but he said he’s not worried at all about being lonely.

“The thrill of the job is actually getting out and meeting with Island exporters,’’ said Murphy, who spent 20 years in the banking industry. “I’ve met with a lot of Island exporters already and (I’m) meeting with government partners, other partners and financial institutions. The fun of the job is getting out and meeting with people so it’s not lonely at all.’’

While Murphy is open to discussions with any business,  his primary focus will be on small- and medium-sized businesses.

The thrill of the job is actually getting out and meeting with Island exporters. I’ve met with a lot of Island exporters already and (I’m) meeting with government partners, other partners and financial institutions. The fun of the job is getting out and meeting with people so it’s not lonely at all.

Patrick Murphy, senior account manager, EDC

“For P.E.I., the great thing is (businesses) are going to have access to a resource on the ground. They could have always had access to a resource,’’ he said, referring to EDC’s offices in Halifax, N.S.; Moncton, N.B.; and St. John’s, N.L. “But, it’s better served when you have boots on the ground. I will meet with as many companies as I can, the ones that I’m aware of that are exporting. (As far as) the ones that I’m not aware of, I’m hoping they find out about us.’’

Opening the P.E.I. office has been in the works for about a year. Murphy, whose wife is from P.E.I., says it took about 10 seconds to convince her to move to the Island.

“It’s really a dream come true,’’ he said.

P.E.I.-based companies are already exporting into markets like the U.S., but Murphy said EDC can help them tap into demand-rich markets beyond that internationally and with less risk.

In addition, the presence of major financial institutions in the region will allow EDC to help more P.E.I.-based companies get the financial support they need, he said. EDC can partner with the banks of exporting companies to share risks on commercial terms, which can help small companies access more financial solutions best suited to their needs.

While P.E.I. is well known for its potatoes and lobster, Murphy sees opportunity in the aerospace sector, pointing to Slemon Park in Summerside, and the chance for further growth.

“Some of the most dynamic exporters in Canada are headquartered in P.E.I., with most of them being small-and medium-sized businesses.’’

Murphy can be reached at 902-626-3037 or by email at PMurphy@edc.ca.