Flag Day fails


Published on February 15, 2017

Services Canada. A few pieces of fabric wrapped around flagpole.

©Eric McCarthy/TC Media

O'LEARY -- Having been alerted to a tattered National Flag of Canada on the Service Canada building on the corner of MacKinnon Drive and Main Street in O’Leary, TC Media conducted a pictorial inventory on National Flag of Canada Day, Feb. 15, of all flags and flag poles on municipal, provincial and federal properties in the Town of O’Leary.

Some flag poles, including the one at Community Hospital, were empty.

The Dos and Don'ts for the National Flag of Canada.

Do

   The National Flag of Canada should always fly alone on its own flagpole or mast.

   The National Flag of Canada can be flown at night without being lit.

   When the National Flag of Canada is raised or lowered, or when it is carried past in a parade or review, people should face the flag, men should remove their hats, and all should remain silent.

The provincial flag on the Access P.E.I. pole has rips, and one piece is dangling from a nearby tree.

   The National Flag of Canada is lowered to half-mast on occasions when a demonstration of sorrow is called for.

   Replace a faded or torn flag with a new one. When a flag becomes tattered and is no longer in a suitable condition for use, it should be destroyed in a dignified way.

   The National Flag of Canada should be treated with respect.

Centennial Park flags have strips dangling.

O'Leary Post Office. Intact except for bottom corner.

Don’ts

   The dimensions/proportions of the National Flag of Canada have an exact ratio of 2 to 1 (twice as long as it is wide), and must not be modified.

   The National Flag of Canada should not be written on or marked in any way, nor be covered by other objects.

   Nothing should be pinned or sewn on the National Flag of Canada.

The National Flag of Canada should never be dipped or lowered to the ground as a means of paying a salute or compliment to any person or thing.

Source: Government of Canada