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N.S. reverend builds scale model dollhouse of Maud Lewis’s home for charity

Roger Moore has been building dollhouses for 20 years, creating scale model recreations of gas stations, restaurants and now the famous Maud Lewis house.
Roger Moore has been building dollhouses for 20 years, creating scale model recreations of gas stations, restaurants and now the famous Maud Lewis house. - Cody McEachern

The dollhouses built are donated to different charities each year

BROOKFIELD, N.S. – For the past 20 years, Reverend Roger Moore has built miniature, scale model dollhouses.

Each year he builds a new dollhouse and donates it to be auctioned off for charity.

This year, Moore recreated a piece of Nova Scotian history by rebuilding a scale model of the famed Maud Lewis house, the home of the late folk painter.

“Maud and her house are a part of our Nova Scotian history,” said Moore.

“I think she was an extremely unique individual, but she never really got the recognition she deserved in her own lifetime. So this is just a little memorial to her to say how important she was. Hopefully her memory will be preserved through it.”

Moore decided to recreate the Lewis house after he went to see the real house, which is currently installed at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in Halifax.

Moore’s dollhouse is a perfect scale model to the Maud Lewis house. He travelled to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in Halifax to measure the original house, and then scaled his dollhouse one inch to the foot of the original house.

Moore’s dollhouse is a perfect scale model to the Maud Lewis house. He travelled to the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in Halifax to measure the original house, and then scaled his dollhouse one inch to the foot of the original house.

While there, he measured the structure to make sure he was building a correctly scaled model of the home.

“Ive always been a model builder, I’ve been building model ships for years,” he said.

“At some point I decided Id try my hand at dollhouses. There is sort of an international organization that works around dollhouse building, and there is a scale to follow as well, which is usually one inch to the foot of the original structure.”

The dollhouses Moore builds are donated to different charities each year, such as the Colchester East Hants Hospice Society who displayed one of Moore’s dollhouses in the Truro Mall to be raffled off.

This year, the dollhouse is going to the CTV’s “Christmas Daddies” telethon to be auctioned on live TV.

“I have no particular criteria for picking charities,” said Moore.

“I just thought they would be one of the best ways to put it on display for people to see properly. I haven’t worked with Christmas Daddies before, but they’ve been very receptive and they are quite anxious to take it on.”

“Christmas Daddies” is an annual telethon run by CTV that raises money through donations and auctions to help less fortunate children have a better Christmas.

“Donations like this mean everything to us,” said Roxanne Robinson, executive director of CTV’s “Christmas Daddies.”

 

Some liberties were taken when recreating the original house, as Moore said he didn’t believe the original structure had much of an upstairs, but he wanted it to be eye-catching.
Some liberties were taken when recreating the original house, as Moore said he didn’t believe the original structure had much of an upstairs, but he wanted it to be eye-catching.

 

“It’s because of these donations and the generous mentality of us as Maritimers that we are able to provide less fortunate children with the Christmas they deserve.”

The “Christmas Daddies” telethon runs in partnership with The Salvation Army, which distributes all the money raised by the telethon to help provide Christmas gifts for children.

The Maud Lewis dollhouse will be auctioned off during the live broadcast, which runs from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Dec. 2.

For Moore, building the dollhouses to raise money for children is not only rewarding, but is also just a good hobby to keep the mind sharp.

I’m in my middle 70s, and the worst thing you could do in life is to just stop doing things,” he said.

“I have a number of projects that keep me going. I work for the First United Church part time, I build my model houses and I’ve even started photography on an amateur level, which I’m enjoying.

“It is just a matter of keeping busy and having a reason to get up in the morning to do something other than complaining about arthritis.”

cody.mceachern@trurodaily.com

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