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J.J. Chaisson heading old-time kitchen party in aid of Farmers Helping Farmers

['The sound of music will fill the Kaylee Hall, Pooles Corner on Feb. 4.']
['The sound of music will fill the Kaylee Hall, Pooles Corner on Feb. 4.']

Farmers Helping Farmers is hosting an old-time kitchen party concert with J.J. Chaisson and Friends to raise money in support of the group’s projects in Kenya.

The performance will take place Friday, Oct. 27, at the Florence Simmons Performance Hall at Holland College in Charlottetown.

“Barry Cudmore reached out to me in the spring, and I love the idea of it,’’ said Chaisson, who’s also known as the Fiddling Fisherman. “Islanders are always willing to help out and this is a vital part of the world we live in.’’

The Chaisson family has strong connections to Farmers Helping Farmers, including teacher Stan Chaisson who travelled to Kenya as a UPEI student.

“Some of the stories that Stan told me about Kenya are great,’’ said J.J. Chaisson. “He’s an avid runner, and men working out in the field would stop what they were doing and run with him in their rubber boots.’’

Farmers Helping Farmers also has deep roots in the Souris area and has been a beneficiary of the Souris Village Feast for a decade, helping to build cookhouses at more than a dozen schools in Kenya.

J.J. Chaisson will be joined by several entertainers, including Darla MacPhee, Brent Chaisson, Kenny Chaisson and some step dancers.

Tickets to the show are $30 with proceeds going to support Farmers Helping Farmers projects. Tickets can be purchased in person at Timothy’s World Coffee, 154 Great George St. in Charlottetown, the Riverview Market and at Florence Simmons box office.

Tickets are also available by emailing farmershelpingfarmerspei@gmail.com or by calling Cudmore at 902-629-9784.

Farmers Helping Farmers is a P.E.I.-based, not-for-profit organization that assists Kenyan farmers in becoming more self-reliant in agricultural food production. It also supports initiatives ranging from water tanks to mosquito nets to school gardens.

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