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There’s money in slime

Isaac Delaney took photos of flowers and sold them in tandem with legend stores. He also helped make and sold sea glass jewelry to turn a profit in his Young Millionaires business.
Isaac Delaney took photos of flowers and sold them in tandem with legend stores. He also helped make and sold sea glass jewelry to turn a profit in his Young Millionaires business. - Eric McCarthy

Young Millionaires try their hands at business

ELMSDALE

They operated canteens, sold candies, firewood, candles, birdhouses and other merchandise, but perhaps the most popular business idea of this year’s Young Millionaires program in West Prince was slime.

In giving their program-closing speeches Wednesday night at the Elmsdale Community Centre, several of the participants acknowledged they made and sold slime in their summer businesses.

“Slime is an awesome stress reliever,” said Jasmin Handrahan who operated a slime shop with her business partner Dakota Gavin. “It comes in all different textures, scents, colours and sizes.”

Gavin added, “we both didn’t actually consider it hard work, because we both love making slime. Plus, to bonus, we made good money, which always makes it fun.

Among their competitors in the slime market was the team of Alana Burden and Kaylynn Veniot.

Although there were other slime-sellers at their first group sales event of the summer, Veniot said competition wasn’t really an issue.

“Everyone’s slime kind of feels different, so it’s kind of just whatever type you like,’ she explained. While she said the nine to 14 age group displayed the most interest in slime, her partnership also directed some of its attention at a younger audience.

“We would have special ones for little kids,” she said. “We would make it a little bit tougher and then it wouldn’t make as much mess.”

Vienna Mullins displays a package of bath bombs she sold in her Young Millionaires program in West Prince. They looked so good that one young customer almost mistook them for candy.
Vienna Mullins displays a package of bath bombs she sold in her Young Millionaires program in West Prince. They looked so good that one young customer almost mistook them for candy.

Vienna Mullins also noted the importance of marketing, admitting two youthful customers might otherwise have mistaken her bath bombs as candy.

There were 42 participants in the program this year including partnerships and sole proprietorships.

The program is funded by Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency and Innovation P.E.I. and administered by the Central Prince Development Corporation with local coordination by CBDC West Prince. Nine local businesses were sponsors.

Many of the participants acknowledged the guidance of their program coordinator, Brooke Smallman.

This was Zachary MacLeod’s second year selling firewood through the Young Millionaires program. He had money stolen from his money jar the first year so the jar was made more secure this year. So far this year he has profited $120 and says he plans to continue selling until the camping season is over.

Justus Tuplin told the audience he enjoyed travelling around the Island gathering up seashells to make clam-danglers and is prepared to continue making and selling them throughout the year.

Kaylynn Veniot reflects on the success of her summer business partnership. She and her friend, Alana Burden had fun making and selling slime, one of the most popular of the West Prince Young Millionaires products this summer.
Kaylynn Veniot reflects on the success of her summer business partnership. She and her friend, Alana Burden had fun making and selling slime, one of the most popular of the West Prince Young Millionaires products this summer.

Summer Gordon told of altering her business plan. She planned to make candles but getting the way at an affordable price was a challenge, so she resorted to placing candles in mason jars and decorating the jars. “They sold like hotcakes,” she revealed. They sold so well that she didn’t have any to display at the program’s closing.

Vegetable-seller Jordyn Dunbar expressed satisfaction with the program, and the hope of one day being an actual young millionaire.

Kameryn Buote and Bria Doucet teamed up to make and sell baked goods and said everyone seemed to like their products. They joked they are hoping to return for the Young Trillionaires program.

Lexie Gallant said her business, Lexie’s Treats and Treasures, sold pop, chips, water slime and more. She revealed that she almost doubled her summer’s goal of turning a $200 profit.

Kenzie and Kolby Buote operated the Sugar Rush candy shop and declared they made tons of friends and lots of money.

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