Licence fees in place for transient businesses

Mike Carson
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SUMMERSIDE – Mobile sales establishments will now have to pay to operate in Summerside.

Council has amended the city’s licensing bylaw to require the fees for local and non-local mobile sales establishments. Council set the fees at $500 for local vendors, businesses that own property within the city, and $1,000 for non-local. The licences are valid for one year.

The move comes in reaction to concerns filed by local businesses that they are put at a competitive disadvantage when transient sales operations are allowed to operate free-of-charge within city limits.

“The feedback that we have received from our membership was that there were concerns about transient sales people being able to come to Summerside and sell and compete without having the burden overhead and burden of fees,” said Patrick McSweeney president of the Greater Summerside Chamber of Commerce. “We also had concerns about people going to Charlottetown and being forced to pay those fees.”

In October 2011, Charlottetown enacted the Transient Traders Bylaw, which requires any outside vendors, who do not operate on a permanent basis in the city, to have a licence to conduct business.

The licence costs $500 per day of operation and any person violating the licensing procedure is guilty of an offense and liable on conviction.

A first offense is punishable by a fine of $1,000 and subsequent offenses are punishable by a fine of up to $500 for each day to a maximum fine of $5,000.

Amherst, N.S., has passed an Auto Vendors Bylaw to control the activities of outside firms setting up shop for a weekend to sell cars.

The bylaw requires a $2,000 per day licensing fee and those companies found guilty of operating without a license are liable for a maximum $10,000 fine per day.

Applicants must have a designated location and operate from that site. If an operator wishes to take part in a special event, such as the Summerside Lobster Carnival or a sports tournament or other activity, written permission from the event’s organizing committee must be presented to city council at least three days prior to the event.

“We felt it was a city issue and the city has addressed it and it should make it a more fair playing field for our members,” McSweeney said.

Up until 2004, Summerside did require licensing fees but opted to drop the provision.

Licences were granted on an individual basis at the discretion of council.

With the reinstatement of the licensing fees, Summerside is now in line with other municipalities in the Maritimes.

Violations of the city’s bylaw carry fines of up $1,000. Each day the violation continues will be treated as a separate offence.

 

mcarson@journalpioneer.com

 

 

Organizations: Greater Summerside Chamber of Commerce

Geographic location: Summerside, Charlottetown, Amherst

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Recent comments

  • Hotdog Guy
    February 25, 2013 - 15:28

    This should prove very interesting for events like the annual Sidewalk Sale and the Lobster Carnival. There just aren't enough sales dollars at these events to justify paying these amounts. You will have no events like these that are succesfull again until these fees are eliminated. How does council intend on handling the Cavendish Farms french fry truck? Or any of the other local's that pull in vehicles or set up tents at these events? The property these events are held on is usually owned by the City (downtown streets, parking spaces, Greens Shore), who gets to grant permission for vendors to set up there?? In years past, us hotdog vendors were looked at as an asset by local police when we set up outside of the local bars, local restaurants would often lock their doors early to keep the drunks out of their establishments. And I assume that this would include local charity organizations that set up BBQ's outside banks and grocery stores to raise money for very good causes.

  • Hotdog Guy
    February 25, 2013 - 15:19

    This should prove very interesting for events like the annual Sidewalk Sale and the Lobster Carnival. There just aren't enough sales dollars at these events to justify paying these amounts. You will have no events like these that are succesfull again until these fees are eliminated. How does council intend on handling the Cavendish Farms french fry truck? Or any of the other local's that pull in vehicles or set up tents at these events? The property these events are held on is usually owned by the City (downtown streets, parking spaces, Greens Shore), who gets to grant permission for vendors to set up there?? In years past, us hotdog vendors were looked at as an asset by local police when we set up outside of the local bars, local restaurants would often lock their doors early to keep the drunks out of their establishments. And I assume that this would include local charity organizations that set up BBQ's outside banks and grocery stores to raise money for very good causes.

  • David A. Parker
    February 24, 2013 - 21:09

    Summerside must be doing this as they are losing money with Route2 and it is the only way they can compinsate route2 loses. Route2's books should be open to the public to see how much money they have lost and the tax payer keeps paying there way out of the mess. There is better WiFi systems out there without using route to. How are they going to deal with Bell and eastlink. This should be and interesting bylaw which is a farce.

  • Maggie
    February 24, 2013 - 20:35

    Route 2 Internet Service sould be licensed to sell services in rural areas!

  • Maggie
    February 24, 2013 - 20:22

    So let me understand this. Nonresident / rural folks have to pay double fees because these folks don't pay property tax inside the city. Actually, rural folks do pay property tax indirectly via goods and services purchased from city folks. The city always wants it their way. Well how about that Route 2 system using city folks tax dollars to unfairly compete with existing internet providers in rural areas. One would think maybe they (the city) needs to pay double fees in the rural areas. Do city tax payers really understand that they are losing money in the rural areas? Check